December 5 Journal Prompt: What Are Your Fears?

What in Life Scares You?

In part of knowing yourself as a writer and as a person, knowing what scares you is a great way of understanding what might act as a block in your life. Of course there are survival fears, such as earthquakes, lightning, being mugged, scorpions, etc. But a lot of times we have fears that have to do with social status, with our families, with our work. These things aren’t survival fears, but culturally constructed fears. In our evolved world where we have less to be morally afraid of, these non-life-threatening fears are just as valid.

Don’t take councel from your Fear

James Faust

Knowing what it is in life that scares you can do two things:

  1. It can inspire your writing, creating writing prompts
  2. It can help you develop more multi-facetted characters
  3. Most importantly, they can serve to block your writing and your path to success.

Fears as Blocks

Especially for writers who are just starting out, there is a lot of fear. Our fears can make or break us. They can work as something to motivate us into action, or they can stop us dead in our tracks by keeping us from starting on our goals, finishing our goals, or even from releasing our goals into the world.

Fear of Commitment Lies Behind the Fear of Writing

Hilary Mantel

Journal Prompt

Spend some time making a list of what scares you. This can be general phobias you have (heights, flying (that’s mine), spiders, trains, fires, etc.) but also the fears that keep you up at night.

Are you afraid of what people will think if they find out you write romance? Are you afraid of what people will think if you tell them that you write at all? Are you afraid to start writing because you think it will take away from your family? Are you afraid to start writing because it might affect your job? Are you afraid of self-publishing because of the costs?

Write down every fear that you can think of and then rank it from worst to not so bad, 1 being the worst.

Spend some time with this list. Spend time journaling and asking yourself what each of these fears is doing to block your path. Are they preventing you from writing? Are they preventing you from finishing your projects? Are they enough to make you give up the idea of writing at all?

For many of the fears you come up with, you’ll find that they either aren’t as big of a deal as you think they are, or they’re an excuse. However, there are of course some that run deep, and you need to spend time working through these fears as well.

Untracable Image credit – Pinned from POPSUGAR, though the post has since been taken down

Unless we are faced with mortal danger, fear does little to serve us in this world. Fear triggers our fight or flight response, and when we’re in a work meeting and afraid, we can do neither, and thus we have to sit with the fear, doing nothing. This can make us sick.

The purpose of today’s journal prompt is to see what fears that aren’t serving you, and to help you begin to consider a plan to dissolve or sidestep that which you are afraid of.

Fear is a prompt not a block.
Writers as me all the time how they can overcome their worst fears. my prescription is always the same: Figure out what you’re most afraid of and write about that. Don’t stop until you’ve put it all on the page. When you use your fear as a prompt it loses its power to block

Bryan Hutchinson, Writer’s Doubt

December Offer

January is a time of starting fresh, of setting up good habits to begin the new you.

Through December, to get excited and ready for January, I’m offering a Free 1-hour session in addition to any monthly package or the 6-month package.

This means that if you sign up for either of the monthly packages, you’ll get 5 sessions instead of four. This includes any of the additional bonuses included in the package. For example, if you sign up for the 6-month package, you will get an additional week of partial manuscript reading and critique.

This offer is only if you sign up for my packages through the month of December.

Don’t miss out starting your 2020 new year write.

Sign up to my mailing list to receive a FREE 3-day mini course on planning and outlining tips to start your novel!

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December 4 Journal Prompt: What Inspires You?

Dec 4: What in life inspires you?

The next few days is going to focus on where you can look for writing ideas in general. By getting to know what affects you in your daily life and in general, you can find a hearty store of prompts to pull from. Knowing yourself means that you can know what to write. You just have to cultivate that knowledge.

The first thing I want you to do is ask yourself—and without cheating and looking up the definition—what inspiration means to you. When you hear this word, what does it make you think of? Does inspiration mean joy? Does it mean motivation?

Once you’ve answered what inspiration means to you, keep your answer in mind as you move on to the next question.

What inspires you in life?

Get really deep with this question. Is it the ever-changing seasons? Is it laughter? Is it seeing the accomplishments of others? Is it motivational music? Movies? Books?

When you know what inspires you personally, you have two benefits:

  1. You can use this inspiration to motivate you toward your goals.
  2. You can use this inspiration as a source of story ideas.

Let’s look at the second on for a moment.

Let us use the example of being inspired by the accomplishments of others. This means that when you’re needing a writing prompt, you can look toward the story of say Jim Morrison and the development of the band, the Doors, and compare it to the struggles of Nicola Tesla, and pull small incidents from their lives and use them as a writing prompt. You might look at the development of a brilliant and revolutionary invention/idea and see what the character who developed this might be like if they took copious amounts of hallucinogenic drugs.

Or perhaps your grandfather was a local hero in the 40’s, and you’ve heard just about every story he has to tell about his life (lucky you!). Where can you pull inspiration from those stories?

These are writing prompts, not full on story ideas, mind you. Keep in mind that those are other people’s intellectual property/stories. But, you can use something from them as a premise to develop your own stories from them.

Feel free to share what you came up with!

December Offer

January is a time of starting fresh, of setting up good habits to begin the new you.

Through December, to get excited and ready for January, I’m offering a Free 1-hour session in addition to any monthly package or the 6-month package. This means that if you sign up for either of the monthly packages, you’ll get 5 sessions instead of four. This includes any of the additional bonuses included in the package. For example, if you sign up for the 6-month package, you will get an additional week of partial manuscript reading and critique.

This offer is only if you sign up for my packages through the month of December.

Don’t miss out starting your 2020 new year write.

Sign up to my mailing list to receive a FREE 3-day mini course on planning and outlining tips to start your novel!

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December 3 Journal Prompt: What Do you Write?

Dec 3: What do you write?

I know that writers fall into many different placements. Some are bloggers and have every intention of remaining a blogger. Some writers are academic writers, who chase the thrill of the research and findings. Some writers are literary, some are poetic, and some only know that they want to write, but haven’t started on a project yet.

It doesn’t matter where you fall in this spectrum: you are a writer, and you can answer today’s questions.

The Single-Genre Writer

There are many writers who know exactly what they like to write. They like to write horror or romance or fantasy. They indulge in cozy mystery, paranormal action/adventure, westerns, or thrillers.

For those of you who have a specific genre you like to write, ask  yourself why you like to write it. Is it because it’s the genre you like to read? Why? What do you get out of reading this genre? Is it because you enjoy working within the parameters of the genre? Why? What would happen if you broke those parameters?

The Multi-Genre Writer

Some writers write across the board, choosing more than one genre to write in. Maybe you like to write science fiction, horror and romance. Maybe you’re an erotica writer who also has a flair for comical mobster stories.

For those of you who have more than one genre, ask yourself what is the common thread between the genres? What would it look like if you combined all the genres into one story? Do you like keeping them all separate?

And finally, ask yourself why you write in so many directions. There is no wrong answer here, and there is no judgement for the answer. This is purely for you, for your own understanding of yourself and your writing methods.

The Budding Writer

Some of us are aspiring. We know we want to write, that we enjoy actually physically running a writing utensil along paper and seeing the ink flow on the page, or we love the sound of the keyboard. We love the idea of creating stories, or constructing a meaningful book, or we simply know we have something to teach.

But we haven’t necessarily begun to write. That’s alright. We don’t have to have started writing to know what we want to write.

If you don’t know what you write yet, ask yourself what you want to write. And as always, ask yourself Why. Ask yourself at least three times. Truly know yourself.

December Offer

January is a time of starting fresh, of setting up good habits to begin the new you.

Through December, to get excited and ready for January, I’m offering a Free 1-hour session in addition to any monthly package or the 6-month package. This means that if you sign up for either of the monthly packages, you’ll get 5 sessions instead of four. This includes any of the additional bonuses included in the package. For example, if you sign up for the 6-month package, you will get an additional week of partial manuscript reading and critique.

This offer is only if you sign up for my packages through the month of December.Don’t miss out starting your 2020 new year write.

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December 2 Journal Prompt: Why Do You Write?

Why Do You Write?

Knowing why you write is an important aspect of being a writer. When you know why you write, then you know the motivation behind getting you out of bed in the morning and wanting to put pen to paper.

However, not all of us know why it is that we want to write. This is why it comes after the question of who we are. The more we understand our motives, the more we’re able to harness our drive and make it work to our advantage.

Are you writing because it’s a form of creative expression? Because you just have a great idea for a story you want to read but haven’t come across? Are you writing because you just need to, but you don’t know why?

Really explore your Why.

For some people, they feel that writing is a way of earning money. If that’s you, ask yourself if that’s enough? Sure we go to our day jobs every day whether we like it or not to earn money, but writing is a whole different beast. It’s not just writing to make a few dollars, but it’s investing with the goal of making money. You’re investing your time, your focus, your energy, and then on top of it you’re investing yourself in marketing, editors, cover design, travel costs, software, etc. It can be draining if that is the only reason you’re writing.

Whatever you come up with, challenge it. Ask yourself Why, at least three times with your answer.

Why Do I Write?
I write because I need to get my ideas down
Why?
I need to get my ideas down because they’re important to me.
Why?
My ideas are important to me because they are an extension of me.
Why is that important?
Because I have a story that I believe will help other people, or, at the very least, will be a contribution to the understanding of what makes a person a person. Thus extending empathy and compassion.

Whatever your reason, challenge it. Really get to the root of why it is you write. You might find that there is something deep in you waiting to come out, and that will only propel you forward toward your writing goals.

December Offer

January is a time of starting fresh, of setting up good habits to begin the new you.

Through December, to get excited and ready for January, I’m offering a Free 1-hour session in addition to any monthly package or the 6-month package. This means that if you sign up for either of the monthly packages, you’ll get 5 sessions instead of four. This includes any of the additional bonuses included in the package. For example, if you sign up for the 6-month package, you will get an additional week of partial manuscript reading and critique.

This offer is only if you sign up for my packages through the month of December.Don’t miss out starting your 2020 new year write.

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December 1 Journal Prompt: Who Are You?

Knowing who you are is a huge thing. This will determine how you write, what you like to write about, where you stand on issues that might come up with your writing, and eventually, how you wan to market yourself.

Getting to know your deeps desires, your core wants, your needs, and what makes you tick is essential to building yourself as an artist.

That beings said, it’s alright not to know. You don’t have to know who you are in order to create. Being an artist, no matter what kind of artist, is how you explore yourself, challenge and express your emotions and ideas.

So while you’re answering this question, you might start by looking at yourself from the outside. Ask yourself these questions:

  • This is how I look to the stranger on the street
  • This is how I look to my neighbor
  • This is how my family/friends see me
  • This is how my boss sees me

Then look at each of these answers and challenge them. Are they right? Are they wrong? What are they missing?

Don’t allow your personal feelings and thoughts about yourself get in the way of answering these questions. Be real with yourself. This is an exercise to look beyond any wounds we have, and try and see what it is that we represent.

When you get clear with yourself on who you are, or at least have a page of “I Don’t Know”, the ask yourself how you feel about the answers you came up with. Is there anything on the page you want to change?

December Offer

January is a time of starting fresh, of setting up good habits to begin the new you.

Through December, to get excited and ready for January, I’m offering a Free 1-hour session in addition to any monthly package or the 6-month package.

This means that if you sign up for either of the monthly packages, you’ll get 5 sessions instead of four. This includes any of the additional bonuses included in the package. For example, if you sign up for the 6-month package, you will get an additional week of partial manuscript reading and critique.

This offer is only if you sign up for my packages through the month of December.

Don’t miss out starting your 2020 new year write.

Sign up to my mailing list to receive a FREE 3-day mini course on planning and outlining tips to start your novel!

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December Journal Prompts

Happy December!

I’m a little late on the ball with this. However, better a late start than a never start!

Through the month of December, I will be posting daily journaling writing prompts to help you prepare for YOUR writing year: 2020. This is the year you’ve been waiting for, the year you make this happen. You can do this.

And to gear you up, you’ll be getting a journal writing prompt a day, right here.

Happy writing!

Writing Prompt: The One You Despise

There are two things that every story has to have:

  • A plot
  • At least one character

The two are very interwoven. You need the character to carry the reader through the plot, but you need the plot so that the character isn’t just hanging out on their couch all day playing video games.

However, more than having an interesting plot, you need to have a character that the reader cares about.

Mary-Sue

A Mary-Sue is a character, male or female, who has no flaws that they have to cover come. In Christopher Pike’s YA series, The Last Vampire, the main character, Sita, is a Mary-Sue. She is this vampire who is just too smart and skilled for her own good.

Likewise, I would argue that Superman is a Mary-Sue. He has one weakness, which is that he cares too much about the girl, and he can’t hack kryptonite. I am bored to tears with that guy.

One reason this is boring as all get out is because the reader needs an element of relatability. No human is perfect, so having a perfect character alienates the reader in some way. When the reader can connect with the MC, then the reader is more likely to get sucked into their plight.

What a reader wants, whether they’re aware of it or not, is a character who evolves in some way. Thus, they need to have some form of character flaw that they work through to become a better person.

Consider Bridget Jones—golly I love that lady. I think just about every woman relates to her in some way, which is why those books did so amazingly, and why watching the movie is both my mom’s and my favorite lazy-day activity. She is hilarious because she’s real. And I don’t mean somewhat relatable, I mean real AF.

She has to overcome her views of self-worth in order to get the guy. What this inspires in all of us is that we too, us real AF women, can get the guy too if we can believe in ourselves.

The relatability in a story means that it takes the reader through the journey as if they were a part of it, and it helps to almost give them an option on how they too can get over their own character flaws.

I know, no pressure, right?

Of course this is in a vague sense. I mean, the princess who goes through all the ordeals that the villain can throw at her and waits until her perfect moment s o that she can escape—is not likely going to happen to the average person who needs to learn their own strengths to save themselves. However, it’s a reminder to their subconscious self that they have the power to take matters into their own hands.

A key element, then, is to ask yourself how your character evolves throughout the story.

Writing Prompt:
The Flawed Character

There are several steps to this exercise, so hang tight.

Step 1

Develop a character you don’t like and describe them having breakfast, or something mundane. This is just so you can really get into the character’s head.

This character doesn’t have to be completely of your own imagination. You can take someone you don’t like and write about them as well.

But as you develop this character, try to keep your prejudices out of it. Write it as if you’re setting this person up as your MC (because that is exactly what you’re doing).

Step 2

The next step is to ask yourself what it is you don’t like about this character. What makes this character somewhat repugnant to you? Is it that they don’t have a family and are totally against having one? Is it that they don’t like puppies? Do they lack compassion? Are they completely boring? Are they a Mary-Sue? Are they constantly sickly because they have no regard for their health and do literally everything wrong in the world in order to look after themselves?

Go on, go crazy when deciding what it is you don’t like about them.

Step 3

Now, ask yourself what it is that they could do to make them likable to you. Is it that they could get a dog? Is it that they could open their minds to something new and different like green eggs and ham? Is it that they could be passionate about something?

Step 4

Now that you have your dislikable character, you’re going to write the story of how they become likable.

Some Examples

There are plenty of examples of curmudgeon characters who develop and become likable. Consider:

  • Shrek, the ogre who wanted nothing to do with anyone, until he learns the value of friendship and companionship.
  • Wilt, from Tom Sharp’s wonderful Wilt series, in which a very old-fashioned man is put in horrendous situations and all he wants to do is go back to being boring and thinking the world’s gone mad (my favorite is when his wife decides she wants to be liberated, gets swept up in the ‘60’s free love movement, and accidentally finds herself at an orgy)
  • The Hound in Game of Thrones – now that guy is great to dislike. He just wants to do his own thing, he wants to do his job, and part of his job is to look scary. He seemingly doesn’t care about anyone, but at the same time he does, actually care. He offered to help Sansa, and later on grew attached to Arya. Both of these are character arcs.

What did you come up with? How did you find this exercise? Let me know in the comments, or feel free to email me about it.

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What is Writing?

The most important message you need to carry with you is this:

You are a writer

That’s the first step.

You know that you have a story or a message that burns within you, that needs to be released. Most importantly, you know that words are your medium.

But what if you don’t? What if you’re struggling with the concept of writing vs. visual art such as painting, collage, film, etc?

I pose the question then:

What is Writing?

Before going on, I want you to pause, consider, perhaps even take out your journal and writ what you believe writing to be for you. What does it mean to you, for you, for your family, for your community, for the world? What is writing?

It’s alright. I’ll wait.


Have you got it down? Excellent. Be sure to share it with me before we got too into my thoughts. It’s your voice that is important, and your voice that the world needs to hear.

I’ll say it again –

What Writing means to You is More Important
than what it means to me.

My Answer: What is Writing?

Writing is about communication in such a way that it brings in not just the immediate information, but the personality behind the words.

We are all a part of a world…
Where there is a human,
there is connection

Writing is a means of connecting one individual to another through words. The word choice one uses, the order in which the words are used, all create a different form of connection between one writer and one reader. To work as a writer means to make a network, and to develop that into a community.

Writing, and thus reading as well, is a way of remembering that we are all a part of a world that might be riddled with screens and technology, but behind every piece of technology, there is a human. Where there is a human, there is connection.

Keeping this in mind is what makes a good writer. It is the difference between data entry or information entry/output. It is the character within any writing piece. When the human element is apparent and behind an article or piece of information, the reader is more likely to relate to the piece, regardless of the content.

If I am to get to the true core of what I believe the purpose of a writer is, what the true purpose of writing is,
I would have to say that it is to record and remind the world of our humanity.

The true purpose of writing is to allow experiences of otherness to infiltrate the comfort of our thinking so that we can understand each other, so that we can understand that we are all a part of this human experience, and thus create empathy in the world.

Where there is empathy, there is compassion. Where there is compassion, there is unity. The job of a writer is to communicate. That communication leads to connection which leads to unity.

Your Turn Again

This is your exercise to get your appetite going.

Take out a piece of paper, or better yet, your journal (every writer should have a journal!), and think about what you decided writing means to you. If you struggled with that part, that’s alright. You can think about what I said about writing as a jumping off point if you’dl ike.

Now, spend some time answering and journaling your thoughts to the following questions:

  • How does your understanding of what writing means to you inspire you?
  • How are you using it to fuel your fire, spark your flame, ignite your creativity?
  • How is your passion serving you?
  • How are you serving your people with your passion?

How did this exercise treat you? Are you feeling ready to create? Are you feeling ready to make writing your focus in your daily routine?

Then let’s keep that fire lit.


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My Story: Editing a Bad Page

Editing a Bad Page

You can always edit a bad page. You can’t edit a blank page.

— Jodi Picoult

The Middle Build

What I didn’t know about my badly written page was that it was turning into a chapter, and actually leading to the middle build of the novel of my 20’s.

When I was 27, I found myself on a bad page I’d written. That page was a book out of my life, and I wasn’t quite sure how to edit it. The truth is, I’d been pantsing my way through life, seeing where the plot and characters would take me. Then all of a sudden, I realized my story was redundant.

I’d just been laid off from my coffee house gig, my partner had left me, and I was experiencing anxiety attacks daily while trying my hand at returning to school. The only thing good I had going for me was school (and of course my awesome and supportive friends and family—very lucky in that department).

I knew something had to change. I set my aims high, so high that I wanted to get into the best English department in England. If I was going to study literature, I might as well do it in England. I set my sights on Durham University, which I did manage to get into.

What I didn’t know about my badly written page was that it was turning into a chapter, and actually leading to the middle build of the novel of my 20’s. Let’s skip forward to the climax, in which I was living in a caravan in a field in North Yorkshire, working 15 hours a week supporting my partner and me and our two dogs, freezing because there was a hole in the bathroom floor big enough to fall through, and my anxiety exhausting me into depression which debilitated me, which then spurred more anxiety because I wasn’t getting anything done.

This was what rock bottom looked like for me. At least, it was the lowest I’d ever been. Something had to change.

That was the decision I made. Something had to change.

The Turn

I pinpointed the fear within me, learned to identify it, learned to address it and quell it by reasoning with it. I learned to release it.

I went to the doctor who sent me to stress management classes which lasted for six weeks and did nothing other than make me feel like I was just being pandered to. I was told I could have one on one sessions, but it took a year to set those up. I was desperate for some actual help at that point, and since the NHS was pretty slow (though otherwise is quite brilliant), I had to take matters into my own hands.

I researched, I read, I wrote, I practiced, I listened. I found countless books to read and listen to on my Kindle or via Audible. Some were profound while others were less than helpful. I began my Tarot website and started producing information on the Tarot and writing, all the while selling Tarot readings. The use of Tarot helped me delve into myself, forced me to journal, and helped me remember my spiritual connection.

I realized that was what I had lost along the way. While living my 20’s, I’d forgotten my faith and love in the Universe, my connection to the earth and elements, and had simply been existing in the material world. So much of me was neglected by neglecting my spiritual side.

I pinpointed the fear within me, learned to identify it, learned to address it and quell it by reasoning with it. I learned to release it. Gradually, over a year, my anxiety almost completely disappeared.

This is the simplified version of my practice, of course. So much time daily went into reading, reflecting, meditating, writing, discussing with others going through similar things, and repeating these exercises.

I learned gratitude, and one thing I am absolutely grateful for was that my job was only part time, which allowed me so much time to work on myself and heal.

By the time I did get to the one-on-one practitioner, were Cognitive Behavioural Therapy sessions, I didn’t really feel that I needed her. I went through the process anyway to see if there was some more information that I missed. But for me, it was just affirming that I was on the right track, that I’d done alright on my own.

The Next Book

We are all writers of our own journeys, of our own projects, of own lives. Why not be #WritersHelpingWriters?

I am of course by no means saying that my way is the way that anyone and everyone should take. This is just my path and what worked for me.

Once I reached a stable point in my life, I realised that it was time to start the book of my 30’s, which is what I’m in now. My story has seeped into the next book, setting myself, and now I’ve had the inciting incident: starting Natural Writer Coaching.

For this novel, I have more of an outline, a structure that I’m aiming for. I don’t think I’ll be panting this one. I know how to correct my course now, at least, I have more tools to do so, and like any writer, I’m still learning my way through the ropes.

Life and writing are a never-ending set of lessons. You won’t be able to master all of it, but you can get pretty good at it.

My goal is to help people with their own projects, their own novels, however they are presented.

Love and Light

Nicola

The Backstory

This is the start of my professional coaching journey. That isn’t to say I haven’t had my time studying and experiencing life as a tutor or mentor. I’ve done both, and done both well, as far as my feedback tells me.

This is where I start to really stretch my legs, to put what I’ve collected and experienced over the years into service. It’s one thing knowing how to bust writing blocks, maneuver around imposter syndrome, and amp up productivity, but it’s another to be able to pass this information along.

While of course I do plan on putting out information and sharing my knowledge and understanding on the blog portion of this website, I also offer one-on-one writing coaching and writing tutoring sessions. The latter is aimed toward students, though can be applied to freelancers writing reports and articles, while the former is aimed toward the writer who is trying to get their ideas on paper, their career started, their story out there.

But here is the starting point. Here is where I introduce myself to you, as per requested by the blog/website overlords that be.

I don’t, however, want to pour my credentials and what-have-you out in this post. That’s what my About page is for. No, instead, I want to simply let you get a taste for who I am, and hopefully give you enough information that you might glean from a chance encounter with me say at a bus depot or a coffee shop.

My earliest ambition that I can recall was to be a story-teller. I wanted to be an artist and I wanted to tell stories. So naturally, as a small child I wanted to write comic books. Eventually, I realized I didn’t really have the artistry to create quality comics, and gave up on the illustration aspect, and just focused on writing.

I wrote my first story when I was seven…something about some traveling barnyard animals and a bat (a character that was shamelessly ripped off from FernGully). The following year, I wrote my first ‘novel.’ It was a hand-written story that took-up at least 40 pages of my spiral notebook with chapters in it, therefore I dubbed it a novel. After that, I kept trying to co-author stories with my friends who would quickly lose interest. We had a series with a pack of kids who would go into a haunted house which would turn them into various monsters (vampires, werewolves, etc.), and the idea was that they were of course based on ourselves, and each of us would write our own character. We had several of these types of pieces on the go, and I remembered regularly sitting down at lunch saying, ‘Okay, guys. We need to get serious about writing this book.’ This of course led to excitement which dissolved into…artistic differences of opinions. I think the majority of the loss of interest was actually the result of just being fed up with disagreements.

However, while I think that perhaps only one of these friends kept writing (though I’m actually not certain since she moved away a few years later), my stories kept coming. I remember writing a story about a racer in the Iditarod, a sled-dog race in Alaska (spoiler alert, the racer froze to death) when I was nine or ten, and another story inspired by the Nickelodeon show, Clarissa Explains it All, about a pre-teen kid who had all the attitude and opinions—which then of course it turned out she was actually an alien trying to hypnotize the human race (Duh!). Such an obvious ending really.

And I could go on and on about the various stories I’ve written and been successful with as well as the stories I’ve written and failed with. But the point is that I’ve written, and written, and written, and not given up writing because it’s what is in me to do. It has always been the goal.

It wasn’t until I reached my mid 20’s that I realized how much I loved talking writing with other writers. It was then that I knew that I wanted to make that my profession. I wanted to work with writers, help them through their ideas, they’re projects, and help them to find their voices. It’s one thing to write for yourself, but it’s a whole other thing to welcome people into the writing circle, help them have the tools to find their own process in their own writing journey, while simultaneously knowing that you’re on the same trek they are: simply to write, whatever that might mean to them.

I learned how to work with different minds through my various occupations, from assisting folks with mild to sever learning and developmental disabilities, to tutoring and mentoring students from various backgrounds, ages, abilities, and learning/thinking styles. I’ve worked in mediums other than writing, working in video production for a few years, and multimodal communications (using more than alphabetic text to convey a message).

All of this is to say that writing to me is more than just words on a page, but experiencing how a person’s mind works. The fun of tutoring, coaching, and mentoring is that you get to experience individual minds, and work with them to find their unique and potent voice and use it in a way that is accessible to anyone.

I could go on. I am a writer, after all. I’m notorious for writing novels in what was intended to be a quick email. I’ll cut this short before I edge too close to 1,000 words on this post (932, 933, 934…), and wrap it up by saying thank you for stopping by and reading my intro. I hope to get to know you better soon!

Love and Light,

Nicola